500 religious leaders joined Native Americans in protest and prayer at Standing Rock.

And of course, many of them came with charity in the form of food and supplies to ease the ongoing struggles of the water protectors.

Native American protesters, many of whom already live in extreme poverty, have been camping out for months along the path of the pipeline. The Oceti Sakowin and Sacred Stone camps alike are in desperate need of cash and supplies — food, batteries, clothing, warmth, and so on — in order to keep fighting, particularly as the temperature starts to drop.‌

“This is what the love of God enacted looks like,” said Rev. Stephanie Sellers.

Sellers is canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism and reconciliation of the Episcopal Church. “As I’m looking around the circle of 524 faith leaders from all over this country, I feel like I’m watching reconciliation,” she said in an interview with the Episcopal News Service.

She also led the gathered leaders in song.

“This is not a liberal or conservative thing. This is not a Republican-Democratic thing. This is a human thing and it’s a Jesus thing to do what is right for all God’s children,” said Bishop Michael Curry.

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Curry is also a representative of the Episcopalian Church. But his sentiment was echoed by many other religious leaders. The president of the Unitarian Universalist Association even released a statement calling the pipeline “a textbook case of marginalizing minority communities.”

“Let us not forget … our native brothers and sisters who are facing the full force of corporate greed and government callousness at the Standing Rock Sioux reservation,” said Imam Zaid Shakir.

He also noted, “We need to change ourselves, end our own greed, transform our own souls, and admit our need for Divine aid in overcoming these daunting challenges.”

These inspiring acts of faith remind us that we are strongest when we stand together and embrace our differences.

After all Native Americans have been through, they deserve some kind of divine intervention, in whatever form that might take. source

 

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